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dc.contributor.authorHarbron R.W.en_US
dc.contributor.authorChapple C-L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorO'Sullivan J.J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLee C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMcHugh K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHigueras M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPearce M.S.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-26T12:58:02Z
dc.date.available2018-01-26T12:58:02Z
dc.date.issued2018-01-18
dc.identifier.issn1573-7284
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11824/763
dc.description.abstractChildren and young adults with heart disease appear to be at increased risk of developing cancer, although the reasons for this are unclear. A cohort of 11,270 individuals, who underwent cardiac catheterizations while aged B 22 years in the UK, was established from hospital records. Radiation doses from cardiac catheterizations and CT scans were estimated. The cohort was matched with the NHS Central Register and NHS Transplant Registry to determine cancer incidence and transplantation status. Standardized incidence ratios (SIR) with associated confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. The excess relative risk (ERR) of lymphohaematopoietic neoplasia was also calculated using Poisson regression. The SIR was raised for all malignancies (2.32, 95% CI 1.65, 3.17), lymphoma (8.34, 95% CI 5.22, 12.61) and leukaemia (2.11, 95% CI 0.82, 4.42). After censoring transplant recipients, post-transplant, the SIR was reduced to 0.90 (95% CI 0.49, 1.49) for all malignancies. All lymphomas developed post-transplant. The SIR for all malignancies developing 5 years from the first cardiac catheterization (2 years for leukaemia/lymphoma) remained raised (3.01, 95% CI 2.09, 4.19) but was again reduced after censoring transplant recipients (0.98, 95% CI 0.48, 1.77). The ERR per mGy bone marrow dose for lympho-haematopoietic neoplasia was reduced from 0.541 (95% CI 0.104, 1.807) to 0.018 (95% CI - 0.002, 0.096) where transplantation status was accounted for as a time-dependent background risk factor. In conclusion, transplantation appears to be a large contributor to elevated cancer rates in this patient group. This is likely to be mainly due to associated immunosuppression, however, radiation exposure may also be a contributing factor.en_US
dc.formatapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherEuropean Journal of Epidemiologyen_US
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessen_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/es/en_US
dc.subjectCardiacen_US
dc.subjectRadiation exposureen_US
dc.subjectDoseen_US
dc.subjectTransplanten_US
dc.subjectCanceren_US
dc.titleCancer incidence among children and young adults who have undergone x-ray guided cardiac catheterization proceduresen_US
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articleen_US
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10654-018-0357-0
dc.relation.publisherversionhttps://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10654-018-0357-0en_US


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